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Chapter 3: Old Fashioned

Nothing says “real webcomic” like a sketchy updating schedule, right? I hope the next one will be forthcoming more quickly.

Say hello to the latest OC of the series! Yes, it’s Nick’s 90s Patterned Shirt!

Water under the Burrows is the comic sequel to Water under the Bridge, go read it if you haven’t already!

If you think sleep is a waste of time, and would like that I spend more hours everyday drawing OC CANCER, please do consider doing your part to keep me caffeinated by clicking this link!

A big THANK YOU to those that already donated! I read every comment you leave but as far as I’m aware there’s no way of replying directly through ko-fi. You know who you are, and I love every one of you!

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▼ Old Comments

chaopz said:
yum

neo4812 said:
are Insects really a good substitute for "meat?"

phantomreader42 said:

neo4812 said:
are Insects really a good substitute for "meat?"

It would depend on the insect, and I'm not sure myself which would be best.

chaopz said:

neo4812 said:
are Insects really a good substitute for "meat?"

easily cultivated high-eeer quality protein, nearly boneless so nothing goes to waste...whats not to like???

Omanisat said:
Insects are high in protein and low in fats, it's an excellent meat substitute, if you can get past the "eating bugs" part.

TendoTwo said:

neo4812 said:
are Insects really a good substitute for "meat?"

In terms of the real world, yes actually. They are high in protein and nutrients while low in fat, and there are much fewer diseases which effect insects that can cross the species barrier to effect mammals, much less humans.

The only real issue is you would need to cultivate a LOT to get the same amount as you would from most other animals, plus most people would find the idea of eating large pieces of insect meat kinda disgusting.

neo4812 said:

TendoTwo said:
In terms of the real world, yes actually. They are high in protein and nutrients while low in fat, and there are much fewer diseases which effect insects that can cross the species barrier to effect mammals, much less humans.

The only real issue is you would need to cultivate a LOT to get the same amount as you would from most other animals, plus most people would find the idea of eating large pieces of insect meat kinda disgusting.

but about larger mammals like lions and tigers?

Beep said:

chaopz said:
easily cultivated high-eeer quality protein, nearly boneless so nothing goes to waste...whats not to like???

The taste.

Iago1 said:

Beep said:
The taste.

Some insects are really tasty. Grilled sugar ants taste like sweet popcorn.

chaopz said:

Beep said:
The taste.

like food, nothing out of the ordinary, but for some that mental block can really distort their palates... indeed its an acquired taste that takes practise to obtain, try some blind taste test those are always fun (thats how I got into durians). also depends on the cook :-)

bruvinluv said:

neo4812 said:
but about larger mammals like lions and tigers?

Protein is protein and nutrients are nutrients. You only need enough to feed a large predator like that.

Bear in mind, pound for pound, insect protein requires a fraction of the resources that a pound of beef, pork, goat or even chicken protein, with fewer harmful fats or lactides.

Seriously, if you don't have a shellfish allergy, there's nothing stopping you from enjoying insect protein (flavor-wise they, like any meat, depend on the cooking and seasoning)

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Ugh.... Hakuna.... Matata....?

"We'll fix it in post."

The despairing cry of directors afflicted with too many Whisky Tango Foxtrot snafus.

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