Furry books

In category: Off Topic

The ages seven to nine are an especially critical time for children. These are the years when they normally make the transition from just hearing and looking at picture books to reading independently for enjoyment and for schoolwork. How well they make this transition will determine much about the quality of their lives. It is very important to find well-written books for your children at this stage.

So, does anyone know of any furry or anthro related literature and especially non-fiction titles? Why do I ask? Because it would be fun to anonymously suggest, order, or donate furry books to local libraries. We will count bestiality too since we want as many suggestions as possible to corrupt enlighten library patrons.

If you don't believe libraries would stock these kinds of books, just remember that almost all of them have books about sex, drugs, suicide, war, guns, and self-defense on the shelves, along with graphic novels and comics for adults, like Watchmen and R. Crumb anthologies. And stools for shorter patrons to reach high shelves.

Genjar suggested the Well World series for containing a lot of species transformation and interspecies sex.

▼ Books

Already Among Us
Fred Patten
ISBN-13: 9780982986646
OCLC: 1035567726

An Anthropomorphic Century
Fred Patten
ISBN-13: 9781614502449
OCLC: 1020285457

Furries among us: essays on furries by the most prominent members of fandom
Thurston Howl
ISBN-13: 9780990890263
OCLC: 959981707

Furry Nation: The true story of America’s most misunderstood subculture
Joe Strike
ISBN-13: 9781627782326
OCLC: 982604556

The Complete Crumb. Volume 3, Starring Fritz the Cat
R Crumb; Gary Groth; Robert Fiore
ISBN: ???
OCLC: 841513640
(see other volumes)

Wet Goddess
Malcolm Brenner
ISBN-13: 9780615334608

Past book thread + and another


I'm afraid that there is a glaring flaw in your plan. Today's children simply do not read (at least analogue books).

My libraries are chock-full of old geezers, and the few children that do come are either playing gta v on the library pc, or are strictly supervised by their caretakers.

The fact that most minor libraries have become a strange mix of daycare centers, gaming stores,video-rentals and plain library tells you how serious things are.

SnowWolf
Former Staff
7 days ago
black_fur blue_eyes blue_feathers blue_hair equine fan_character feathered_wings feathers female feral flying fur hair hi_res horn mammal multicolored_hair my_little_pony shilokh smile snowdrift snowflake solo star watermark white_feathers winged_unicorn wings

Rating: Safe
Score: 23
User: SnowWolf
Date: July 28, 2012

Haljkljavahlibrz said:
I'm afraid that there is a glaring flaw in your plan. Today's children simply do not read (at least analogue books).

My libraries are chock-full of old geezers, and the few children that do come are either playing gta v on the library pc, or are strictly supervised by their caretakers.

The fact that most minor libraries have become a strange mix of daycare centers, gaming stores,video-rentals and plain library tells you how serious things are.

My niece, who just turned 11, begs to differ. She loves her library. she spends a tone of time there. When offered books on her tablet. she refuses, because she likes the way a real book feels in her hands. No one taught her this. Her parents don't read much and prefer mobile devices when they do read. I'm a reader, but I haven't bought a paper book in years. All kindle for me.

Anyway, she loves the Warrior Cats series, which a lot of libraries probably already have, but it turned her from "I like animals" to "Baby Furry"

.... also, While I don't mind cub stuff, the idea of exposing kids purposefully to sexual stuff is really skeevy. It's just as likely to backfire and make them feel really uncomfortable with what the book is presenting. I promise, we don't need sex in books to have crushes on Simba or Robin Hood.


SnowWolf said:
My niece, who just turned 11, begs to differ. She loves her library. she spends a tone of time there. When offered books on her tablet. she refuses, because she likes the way a real book feels in her hands. No one taught her this. Her parents don't read much and prefer mobile devices when they do read. I'm a reader, but I haven't bought a paper book in years. All kindle for me.

Good for her, but (at least where i come from) she would not be an average representative of children her age.

As to the books, Watts Martin's Kismet is a nice and engaging scifi about furries (genetically modified humans) in the future, and the identity conflict between baseline humans and modified ones, The Animorphs are also a nice read, The Story of Despero is a lovely fantasy story about semi-anthro mice and rats in medieval fantasy setting.

As for non-fiction, i'm afraid that, since the fandom is still young, you won't find much else besides of what you posted here.

Genjar
Former Staff
7 days ago
2011 annoyed antennae arthropod biped black_markings blue_eyes clear_membrane clothed clothing crossed_arms cute duo feral front_view green_body human insect insect_wings lifting lol_comments male mammal markings moth nisimawari pellucid_hawk_moth portrait quadruped shirt shorts simple_background solo_focus spread_wings standing three-quarter_portrait three-quarter_view traditional_media_(artwork) watercolor_(artwork) white_background wings

Rating: Safe
Score: 278
User: Genjar
Date: May 29, 2013

Lance_Armstrong said:
So, does anyone know of any furry or anthro related literature and especially non-fiction titles? Why do I ask? Because it would be fun to anonymously suggest, order, or donate furry books to local libraries. We will count bestiality too since we want as many suggestions as possible to corrupt enlighten library patrons.

No idea about non-fiction, but as for fiction...

First thing that pops to my mind is The Merro Tree by Katie Waitman. Good story (as evident from the average rating) that focuses on topics that I expect to appeal to teens, and it has an overarching subplot featuring gay interspecies relations (between humanoid alien and feral snake-alien). Nothing blatantly explicit: from what I've heard, the story originally contained more sex scenes, but the publisher wanted those toned down.

But like SnowWolf said, why not just focus on donating good books that prominently feature non-human characters? Doesn't have to be sexual in nature. Such as Startide Rising by David Brin (uplifted dolphins), the Liaden universe series by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (anthro turtles), or Hellspark by Janet Kagan (birds).


Haljkljavahlibrz said:
I'm afraid that there is a glaring flaw in your plan. Today's children simply do not read (at least analogue books).

My libraries are chock-full of old geezers, and the few children that do come are either playing gta v on the library pc, or are strictly supervised by their caretakers.

The fact that most minor libraries have become a strange mix of daycare centers, gaming stores,video-rentals and plain library tells you how serious things are.

I'm half joking. I just want library patrons to have the opportunity to get exposed to furry, no matter who it is. But some of the kids that end up in the library for hours might actually go where the difficult books are instead of playing on the computer.

Most libraries seem to have some kind of partnership that allows virtual lending of ebooks. I don't know if kids will use this either.

Most kids will go furry the same way they have for decades: exposure to funny animal sex propaganda like in Space Jam, Zootopia, Shrek, etc.

I also wanted to know if there are more of these books out there.

SnowWolf said:
the idea of exposing kids purposefully to sexual stuff is really skeevy. It's just as likely to backfire and make them feel really uncomfortable with what the book is presenting. I promise, we don't need sex in books to have crushes on Simba or Robin Hood.

Kids can walk around unaccompanied in a library, grab some pretty adult content, sit in a corner reading it, and just put it back instead of checking the book out. Nobody is stopping them from doing that other than themselves and their parents, as long as they aren't being hugely disruptive and loud. I just went to a library that had various adult-oriented comics graphic novels (Watchmen, R. Crumb, and others) as well as some manga in stock, which are probably a bigger draw for kids than any of the literature around. I doubt any of them were close to being pornographic. But kids can easily find books about sex, drugs, suicide, etc. on the shelves. They can also go read science fiction novels, and many of those have adult themes. Those also have the highest prevalence of furry-related content due to sci-fi anthro and alien hybrids.

Haljkljavahlibrz said:
As for non-fiction, i'm afraid that, since the fandom is still young, you won't find much else besides of what you posted here.

The concepts that the fandom are rooted in have been around for centuries or millennia. See: Greek mythology. But you are right and it looks like there is almost no mainstream publishing interest, compared to the many blogs and self-published ebooks.

Genjar said:
But like SnowWolf said, why not just focus on donating good books that prominently feature non-human characters?

People can do what they want. I just felt like throwing an inspirational idea in with my short list starter. I am now looking around to see what options nearby libraries have for suggesting new books for their catalogs.

Genjar
Former Staff
7 days ago
2011 annoyed antennae arthropod biped black_markings blue_eyes clear_membrane clothed clothing crossed_arms cute duo feral front_view green_body human insect insect_wings lifting lol_comments male mammal markings moth nisimawari pellucid_hawk_moth portrait quadruped shirt shorts simple_background solo_focus spread_wings standing three-quarter_portrait three-quarter_view traditional_media_(artwork) watercolor_(artwork) white_background wings

Rating: Safe
Score: 278
User: Genjar
Date: May 29, 2013

Lance_Armstrong said:
I am now looking around to see what options nearby libraries have for suggesting new books for the catalog.

Not sure if this applies to US, but having worked as a librarian for a few years, I can say that offering book donations would likely work better. If you try to request for an older book to be added to the catalog, it's probable that you'll be told to simply interlibrary loan it instead.

But donations? Most libraries accept like those. (Except stuff that requires extra licensing fees, such as games and movies.)

SnowWolf
Former Staff
6 days ago
black_fur blue_eyes blue_feathers blue_hair equine fan_character feathered_wings feathers female feral flying fur hair hi_res horn mammal multicolored_hair my_little_pony shilokh smile snowdrift snowflake solo star watermark white_feathers winged_unicorn wings

Rating: Safe
Score: 23
User: SnowWolf
Date: July 28, 2012

Haljkljavahlibrz said:
Good for her, but (at least where i come from) she would not be an average representative of children her age.

Honey. Speaking as the kid who never went anywhere without a book or two (or three just in case)... and lived in the library. I am pretty positive that 'well read' has never been the 'average' among children. Or adults.

The Animorphs are also a nice read

I understand that the appropriate reaction here is to laugh and then start crying.

Genjar said:
No idea about non-fiction, but as for fiction...

First thing that pops to my mind is The Merro Tree by Katie Waitman. Good story (as evident from the average rating) that focuses on topics that I expect to appeal to teens, and it has an overarching subplot featuring gay interspecies relations (between humanoid alien and feral snake-alien). Nothing blatantly explicit: from what I've heard, the story originally contained more sex scenes, but the publisher wanted those toned down.

But like SnowWolf said, why not just focus on donating good books that prominently feature non-human characters? Doesn't have to be sexual in nature. Such as Startide Rising by David Brin (uplifted dolphins), the Liaden universe series by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (anthro turtles), or Hellspark by Janet Kagan (birds).

Brin's stuff is fantastically good--Dated yet somehow not so dated at the same time. The first uplift book wasn't very exciting but the first trilogy was great. I really should read the second trilogy, but it was honestly a bit 'thick' to chew through for me... but the older I get, the less tolerant I am of a number of things. (and, sadly, a lot of the tropes of older styled writing tends to push my buttons these days)

Lance_Armstrong said:
I also wanted to know if there are more of these books out there.

Oh gosh yes.

Let me think about some of my favorites:

Let us start with the granddaddy of stories: Watership Down by Richard Adams. A story about a group of rabbits who escape death and travel accross the countryside to find a new home. Full of delicious bunny-lore and bunny-lifestyles, this book is ... really good. The author died about a year ago. ... I cried. I don't think i've cried about any authors, actors, or musicians before. But Richard Adams made me cry. (But if I DID, it would have been over Robin Williams or Alan Rickman.) They made a movie too-- My parents innocently rented it. It traumatized me. I love this book, though.

Tailchaser's Song by Tad Williams A cat goes on an adventure to save the cat he loves. It's watership down, but with cats, but also with a bit of dnd thrown in.

The Rats of NIMH books - Before Don Bluth was making movies. Mrs Frisby (or Brisby, if you like) was the star of a book. There are a few sequels, but they're not as good.

Charlotte's Web

Bunnicula A whole series of stories about a cat, a dog and the pet rabbit who may or may not suck the blood out of vegetables. (honestly, they're cute stories and tend to be mild mystery

The dragonriders of Pern series.

Ratha's Creature by Clare Bell - Oh baby. This was one of my formulative books. So, there's a clan of cats. they are called the Named. they are intelligent and they keep and herd some deer-like animals. A young cat named Ratha discovers the power of fire and is exiled. She must learn to survive on her own, in the land of the barbaric unnamed. .... and bonus points for you :P there's even a cat sex scene that I remember reading over and over again, in confused, embarrassed interest. .. .Clare Bell is a fabulous writer, and Ratha's Creature has several sequels. She's also written a book about a werejaguar shifter thing in the aztec empire, and a story about time traveling telepath cheetahs that I've never read because I can't find a copy of it.

I never read them, but Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar series is suposedly stuffed with telepathic animal companions.

Dragon of the Lost Sea by Laurence Yep. This is one of those books no one's really heard about because while Laurence Yep is a prolific author of children's stories and has won the Newbery twice, his other books are much more popular. These stories are retellings of the Monkey King/ Journey to the west story, about tan exiled dragon princess and her human.

The Enchanted Forest Chronicles. by Patricia C. Wrede - a princess decides that princessing is boring, and runs away from home and starts working for a dragon. This is one of those delightful books serieses where the last book takes place a dew decades after the first, so you can see the 'happily ever after' in action.

There are SO many!

(OH MY GOSH! In writing this, I discovered that one of my favorite authors as a kid--Garry Kilworth-- has kindle versions of many of his books, now. Which is lovely, as I only read the story about the foxes, but he has books about rabbits, and weasels and wolves)

Kids can walk around unaccompanied in a library, grab some pretty adult content, sit in a corner reading it, and just put it back instead of checking the book out. Nobody is stopping them from doing that other than themselves and their parents, as long as they aren't being hugely disruptive and loud. I just went to a library that had various adult-oriented comics graphic novels (Watchmen, R. Crumb, and others) as well as some manga in stock, which are probably a bigger draw for kids than any of the literature around. I doubt any of them were close to being pornographic. But kids can easily find books about sex, drugs, suicide, etc. on the shelves. They can also go read science fiction novels, and many of those have adult themes. Those also have the highest prevalence of furry-related content due to sci-fi anthro and alien hybrids.

My point more was that kids tend to be aware when something is "too much" for them. I can remember hastily closing a book because I knew that hat I was reading was Too Adult For Me. ...and I can remember reading it with silent curiosity and fascination. But those feelings stay with us. Being made uncomfortable by something can make us avoid it. It's very easy to ruin something, especially for a child, by thrusting something they're not ready to deal with yet in their faces. Just because they CAN find adult content laying around doens't mean that they want it. Some kids will seek it out, others won't. We all grow at different rates.

D4rk
Member
6 days ago
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Rating: Safe
Score: 125
User: masterwave
Date: July 03, 2013

I don't know many furry books that aren't mentioned already or are already in every good library

Reynard the Fox by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is the only thing that comes to my mind.
It's a good book, and a classic here in Germany. It's about politics, manipulation of it and critique on monarchy and religion. There's also rape (implicated),mutilation and murder.

Stuff like "Animal Farm", "Watership Down" etc. should be found in any library nowadays

Genjar
Former Staff
6 days ago
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Rating: Safe
Score: 278
User: Genjar
Date: May 29, 2013

SnowWolf said:
I never read them, but Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar series is suposedly stuffed with telepathic animal companions.

While there are telepathic animals, the focus tends to be elsewhere. For instance, the Last Herald-Mage trilogy focuses on homophobia, and is definitely not suitable for children. Especially not the third book (gang rape and all that). The Mage Wars trilogy is most relevant to furries, because of the gryphons. Though I can only recommend the first, The Black Gryphon. The sequels aren't as good. (And again, mature themes - Lackey writes a lot about casual sex).

Speaking of grim, one children's book that definitely influenced me as a kid was The Animals of Farthing Wood by Colin Dann. Not a happy story for most of the characters.

I can't think of any other relevant children's books. Most of my favorites have never been translated to English.

As for furry books in general, there's way too many series to list. Here's some for scalies: Quintaglio Ascension by Robert J. Sawyer, Dragons by Thorarinn Gunnarsson, Fanuilh by Daniel Hood, Dragonlord by Joanne Bertin...


Probably my favorite book series ever is the mistmantle chronicles
It's about animals living on an island in a roughly medieval society. Rather child friendly if you ask me, the scary elements are not so much detailed descriptions of gore or monsters but more an ominous feeling. The fact that the main character is a squirrel, my fav animal, may also have something to do with my fascination of the series.


SnowWolf said:
... and lived in the library.

If you mean this literally, i truly envy you. Ironically out of some ~1500 books i was/am surrounded with, only about 100-150 were and are of significant interest to me :/.

Ps. TvTropes's "Popular with Furries" should be a wellspring of sources (see literature subfolder).

SnowWolf
Former Staff
6 days ago
black_fur blue_eyes blue_feathers blue_hair equine fan_character feathered_wings feathers female feral flying fur hair hi_res horn mammal multicolored_hair my_little_pony shilokh smile snowdrift snowflake solo star watermark white_feathers winged_unicorn wings

Rating: Safe
Score: 23
User: SnowWolf
Date: July 28, 2012

Genjar said:
While there are telepathic animals, the focus tends to be elsewhere. For instance, the Last Herald-Mage trilogy focuses on homophobia, and is definitely not suitable for children. Especially not the third book (gang rape and all that). The Mage Wars trilogy is most relevant to furries, because of the gryphons. Though I can only recommend the first, The Black Gryphon. The sequels aren't as good. (And again, mature themes - Lackey writes a lot about casual sex).

Fair! I didn't know about all that! Well, I knew that there was lots of gay in it--at the time that was pretty hard to find in any books. Just, never got around to reading it.

Besides, the lion king isn't a story about lions, it's a story about a child's journey into adulthood: losing his father and discovering that his heroes are villans, and, after a period of escapism, growing up. Robin Hood is about income inequalities, not foxes, bears and lions. Zootopia's about animals, but only as a metaphor for social issues. You could replace zootopia with a class of aliens and spend a few more minutes explaining how the red aliens used to eat the blue ones and it's the same. The focus doesn't HAVE to be on the telepathic animals. Pern isn't about the dragons, it's about the politics of the world. But that honestly makes it more exciting. As a kid, dreaming about finding a telepathic Wolf is great! but dreaming about a telepathic wolf who gives you special powers and getting to roam around the world together, fighting crimes and adventuring together is WAY more compelling. Having a detailed fantasy world with rules makes ANY story more compelling.

Take Digimon, for example. I loved that show as a kid, but mostly? it was about kids who had Digimon who ran around the Digiworld and did Digithings and there was a Digiplot, but who really remembers all of it? (looking at wiki? the first digimon was basically "oh no, there's EVIL! we must beat it! time to DIGIVOLVE!")

Then there's Pokemon, where people who have pokemon do all kinds of jobs. Nurse? You have a pokemon helper. police officer? pokemon helper. Pokemon are everywhere. want to be a cowboy? you've got your own rapidash and probably a flock of doggo pokemon who help you wrangle your Tauros. wanna be an artist? there's a pokemon for that. Everyone has a pokemon or two. and pokemon are friends and tools equally. Is there a war? it's fought with pokemon. Exploring space? pokemon are there. No matter what you want to be, there's a place for you in that world. With Pokemon.

It's why so many young adult scifantasy books are in alternate worlds. In twilight you've got a complex lore around vampires and werewolves and Other Things. Hunger Games? There's a whole world of districts and cities and a story that anyone can fit into. We grow out of dreaming about being Ash and having Pikachu to being our own trainers with our own pokemon. We don't want to be Simba, we want to be part of his world, though. we want a Kingsona, as the kids say.

Haljkljavahlibrz said:
If you mean this literally, i truly envy you. Ironically out of some ~1500 books i was/am surrounded with, only about 100-150 were and are of significant interest to me :/.

Well... I grew up in a well populated and growing town. My dad did work that was frequently dull to me (as a handyman), and he was a single parent, so once I reached a certain age, he'd drop me off at the library while he did more work. In middle school, the library was about 1000 feet away across an open field. I regularly walked there after school. My best friend also read, possibly more than I did, so we'd end up there together. Later, after she learned to drive, she'd drive us home after school, with regular stops by the library. We would borrow like... 5-10 books at a time and drop by once a week or so.

The library itself had a moderate YA, and scifantasy section but a very large fiction section. I read a LOT of books I'll never remember, but I tried out a lot of things that simply had a neat cover or title. This was in the days before the internet was everywhere (90's) and self publishing books wasn't a thing... so, I didn't, y'know, review every book before I checked it out. Just looked at the cover, flap, and maybe read a few pages. :)

Also, book store workers and librariians are great resources. I remember repeatedly asking for books about animals, but like, where they talk and stuff. (Watership down had apendixes! and GLOSSARIES! all about rabbit culture! It was lovely :D


Heh, i had the fortune of being born in my country's capital, so i had 2 decent libraryes less than a half a kilometer away from me, and two a bit further.

My mom studied literature and is a bibliophile so she amassed a spectacular amount of literature (and grammar/language) books. The scifi/fantasy/fiction section was decent (lotr,asoiaf,shadowmarch/mst trilogy) and she made sure to imbibe said bibliophillia into me aswell :)

Now i have a situation that the only room without any book is the bathroom XD

Glad to see that there is a fellow reading afficionado here ;)


In the vein of fiction, I'm a little disappointed that a Ctrl-F doesn't represent Brian Jacques or the Redwall series. From memory, that would be a good series for the 7-9 demographic.