BlueDingo
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14 days ago
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Rating: Safe
Score: 2
User: Circeus
Date: January 03, 2015

rhyolite said:
On a more exotic level I'd say being trapped in a no-man's-land between reality unreality, like some sort of shadow-realm where I can partly see the world but have no power to make anyone see or hear me.
Not being able to pass into this world, being forever in a form of limbo between this world and the next sort of thing.

There's nothing exotic about isolation.


BlueDingo said:
There's nothing exotic about isolation.

speak for yourself

BlueDingo
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Rating: Safe
Score: 2
User: Circeus
Date: January 03, 2015

notawerewolf said:
speak for yourself

Don't we all?

Dogenzaka
Privileged
14 days ago

Losing my hands, eyesight, or hearing.


BlueDingo said:
Don't we all?

I do, it's fun, or disturbing, whichever side you are in


People following my sister at her workplace. Knowing that they probably know where we live.

Being unable to preemptively murk them without invoking the wrath of an organized sex trafficking ring. Knowing that if anything ever happened, I'd likely never get revenge. Real life aint the movies.


Dogenzaka said:
Losing my hands, eyesight, or hearing.

don't listen to loud music

BlueDingo
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Rating: Safe
Score: 2
User: Circeus
Date: January 03, 2015

Fenrick said:
don't listen to loud music

How would that affect your eyesight?


Knotty_Curls said:
People following my sister at her workplace. Knowing that they probably know where we live.

Being unable to preemptively murk them without invoking the wrath of an organized sex trafficking ring. Knowing that if anything ever happened, I'd likely never get revenge. Real life aint the movies.

https://i.imgur.com/FUN5mJK.png


BlueDingo said:
How would that affect your eyesight?

Staying up too late staring at your music browser's screen


Heteroxon said:
Reminds me of my nightmare last night. I had this dream I was on the 8th floor of an abandoned building, and I was balancing around floors that were falling apart, while a bunch of shadowy men ran at me. I had to use a crowbar to clunk them all on the head and knock them down through the several breaking metal floors. Then a bunch of people with identifiable features started to float after me with these creepy smiles on their faces and then I couldn't do anything about that, because they were already dead. So I woke up terrified and started running around the house because I could still see them.

That is frightening.


BlueDingo said:
There's nothing exotic about isolation.

Put a socialite in dark room by themselves, with no widows and door knob. They won't last 5 seconds. Some people need the constant voice of others to feel safe and things.

BlueDingo
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14 days ago
2012 5_fingers abstract_background anthro armor blood blood_on_weapon bovine cleaning digital_media_(artwork) digital_painting_(artwork) eye_scar facial_scar front_view fur green_fur greg_staples half-length_portrait half_portrait holding_object holding_weapon horn magic_the_gathering male mammal melee_weapon minotaur official_art plate_armor portrait scar shoulder_guards simple_background soldier solo standing sword weapon

Rating: Safe
Score: 2
User: Circeus
Date: January 03, 2015

MrKranberryJam69 said:
Put a socialite in dark room by themselves, with no widows and door knob. They won't last 5 seconds. Some people need the constant voice of others to feel safe and things.

Add "no twitter" to that list and you could do this to the average millennial at will.


BlueDingo said:
Don't knock it until you try it. It's actually quite liberating.

Eh, I will pass. All I known is existing. The idea of not existing terrifies me.


BlueDingo said:
Don't knock it until you try it. It's actually quite liberating.

That's what "they" want you to think. They push a pro-death narrative in the media, but will be the first to benefit when anti-aging therapies are developed.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's what "they" want you to think. They push a pro-death narrative in the media, but will be the first to benefit when anti-aging therapies are developed.

yep, and once money comes into the equation it'll be back to the usual: the rich get richer while finding ways to exploit those who aren't as rich for even more money.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's what "they" want you to think. They push a pro-death narrative in the media, but will be the first to benefit when anti-aging therapies are developed.

i don't know the pro-death narrative you're saying is in the media. but i'd much rather return to nonexistence regardless. t'would be paradise


notawerewolf said:
i don't know the pro-death narrative you're saying is in the media.

That's because the narrative is omnipresent in movies, television, news reports, obituaries, etc. These program you to accept death as "normal", "natural", and "inevitable", which is false. When immortality is brought up in fiction, it is often treated as "unnatural" or as a curse. Many here will say "I don't want to live for a thousand years" because they lack the imagination and motivation to explore what this planet and universe has to offer. The truth is that your body is a machine, and with advances in medical knowledge it could be "fixed" and "tuned up" before you experience arthritis, organ failure, Alzheimer's, and other aging diseases. Anti-aging will become a cheap form of preventative health care, which will end up lowering medical expenses despite delivering better health outcomes.

Media will eventually be forced to adapt to the new reality, like how cell phones and smartphones changed the portrayal of how characters act in film and TV.

I didn't even bring up the idea of an afterlife, which plays a big role in supporting the false narrative but can't be discussed here.

notawerewolf said:
but i'd much rather return to nonexistence regardless. t'would be paradise

That statement is equivalent to endorsing conditional suicide.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's because the narrative is omnipresent in movies, television, news reports, obituaries, etc. These program you to accept death as "normal", "natural", and "inevitable", which is false. When immortality is brought up in fiction, it is often treated as "unnatural" or as a curse. Many here will say "I don't want to live for a thousand years" because they lack the imagination and motivation to explore what this planet and universe has to offer. The truth is that your body is a machine, and with advances in medical knowledge it could be "fixed" and "tuned up" before you experience arthritis, organ failure, Alzheimer's, and other aging diseases. Anti-aging will become a cheap form of preventative health care, which will end up lowering medical expenses despite delivering better health outcomes.

Media will eventually be forced to adapt to the new reality, like how cell phones and smartphones changed the portrayal of how characters act in film and TV.

I didn't even bring up the idea of an afterlife, which plays a big role in supporting the false narrative but can't be discussed here.

That statement is equivalent to endorsing conditional suicide.

born too early for immortality.

born too late to believe in heaven.

born just in time to post t r a n s h u m a n i s t propaganda.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That statement is equivalent to endorsing conditional suicide.

you mean euthanasia and P.A.D.? cause if so, i can tell you sir. patrick stuart ain't the only one who proudly supports that shit. hell yeah i endorse it 100%


fewrahuxo said:
born just in time to post t r a n s h u m a n i s t propaganda.

If I'm right, I get a chance to live, if I'm wrong, I die.

If you're right, you die, if you're wrong, you get a chance to live.

That's all there is to this wager. The only people who need to be convinced are the people who will fund the medical developments. A lot of nouveau riche people are stepping up to the plate and that is a good thing.

notawerewolf said:
you mean euthanasia and P.A.D.? cause if so, i can tell you sir. patrick stuart ain't the only one who proudly supports that shit. hell yeah i endorse it 100%

I would also support it even if all diseases including aging are cured. But you should acknowledge that if aging and other diseases are cured, you can no longer use illness (possibly excluding mental) as an excuse.

In the places where assisted suicide, or voluntary euthanasia, is legal in the U.S., the laws apply to patients with terminal illnesses. These laws would not apply to people who are healthy and free of aging diseases, but are just bored of life or depressed. While it may be impossible to stop a determined person from committing suicide, and suicide is no longer technically a crime for the individual committing the act in the U.S., the systems in place strongly discourage suicide. For example, "In California, medical facilities are empowered or required to commit anyone whom they believe to be suicidal for evaluation and treatment." In effect, the state can force you to stay alive until you change your mind. Assuming you do.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's all there is to this wager. The only people who need to be convinced are the people who will fund the medical developments. A lot of nouveau riche people are stepping up to the plate and that is a good thing.

the last time you tried tuning up your body you lost seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal.


fewrahuxo said:
the last time you tried tuning up your body you lost seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal.

It's not about the destination, m'boy. It's about the ride. And the ride never ends. You have to mount that bike and caress every curve, hill, and peak.

Also, almost everyone in the sport was doping.


Lance_Armstrong said:
I would also support it even if all diseases including aging are cured. But you should acknowledge that if aging and other diseases are cured, you can no longer use illness (possibly excluding mental) as an excuse.

it's an issue of preference. i don't want to live forever or really at all so i'll readily take one heaping helping of death whenever it comes


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's because the narrative is omnipresent in movies, television, news reports, obituaries, etc. These program you to accept death as "normal", "natural", and "inevitable", which is false. When immortality is brought up in fiction, it is often treated as "unnatural" or as a curse. Many here will say "I don't want to live for a thousand years" because they lack the imagination and motivation to explore what this planet and universe has to offer. The truth is that your body is a machine, and with advances in medical knowledge it could be "fixed" and "tuned up" before you experience arthritis, organ failure, Alzheimer's, and other aging diseases. Anti-aging will become a cheap form of preventative health care, which will end up lowering medical expenses despite delivering better health outcomes.

cheap... again, when money comes into play, the rich will always benefit the most while the poor suffer.

and if you try and get around the system, those who can pay will hound you every step of the way. kinda like with piracy of video games and other forms of media. it doesn't matter if you can't afford to pay. you have no excuse and everyone who can pay for the stuff you try and get for free will never let you here the end of it. they'd rather see you live a life of endless boredom and tedium and likely wind up depressed to some extent until you manage to find alternative forms of entertainment (which wouldn't end well if the alternative choice happened to be drinking and/or drugs).

it's a horrible, vicious, system built around one thing and one thing alone: greed

when it comes to the form of immortality you spoke of in that quoted comment, trying to get it for free will (like with everything) lead to you being considered a criminal. even if it's highly unlikely you'll ever get punished for it, everyone will just keep nagging and complaining about how you didn't cough up the money and as such, you don't deserve to have it.

pretty stupid really...

Lance_Armstrong said:
In effect, the state can force you to stay alive until you change your mind. Assuming you do.

that is seriously fucked up. and likely plays into how some people would rather not be a burden on friends and family towards the end yet things continue to get dragged out for quite a while regardless thus making them a burden whether they want tto be one or not. not a nice thing to think about but i'm sure it's true in a good number of cases.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's because the narrative is omnipresent in movies, television, news reports, obituaries, etc. These program you to accept death as "normal", "natural", and "inevitable", which is false. When immortality is brought up in fiction, it is often treated as "unnatural" or as a curse. Many here will say "I don't want to live for a thousand years" because they lack the imagination and motivation to explore what this planet and universe has to offer. The truth is that your body is a machine, and with advances in medical knowledge it could be "fixed" and "tuned up" before you experience arthritis, organ failure, Alzheimer's, and other aging diseases. Anti-aging will become a cheap form of preventative health care, which will end up lowering medical expenses despite delivering better health outcomes.

Media will eventually be forced to adapt to the new reality, like how cell phones and smartphones changed the portrayal of how characters act in film and TV.

I didn't even bring up the idea of an afterlife, which plays a big role in supporting the false narrative but can't be discussed here.

That statement is equivalent to endorsing conditional suicide.

The Doctor is immortal, and he does perfectly fine.


Lance_Armstrong said:
That's because the narrative is omnipresent in movies, television, news reports, obituaries, etc. These program you to accept death as "normal", "natural", and "inevitable", which is false. When immortality is brought up in fiction, it is often treated as "unnatural" or as a curse. Many here will say "I don't want to live for a thousand years" because they lack the imagination and motivation to explore what this planet and universe has to offer. The truth is that your body is a machine, and with advances in medical knowledge it could be "fixed" and "tuned up" before you experience arthritis, organ failure, Alzheimer's, and other aging diseases. Anti-aging will become a cheap form of preventative health care, which will end up lowering medical expenses despite delivering better health outcomes.

Media will eventually be forced to adapt to the new reality, like how cell phones and smartphones changed the portrayal of how characters act in film and TV.

I didn't even bring up the idea of an afterlife, which plays a big role in supporting the false narrative but can't be discussed here.

That statement is equivalent to endorsing conditional suicide.

I mean, if you want to be really technical, living forever is not a goal you're going to attain unless you reach a life that is so far from where we are now that you would be unrecognizable as human, which is way beyond anti-aging things. But unless you get to that point, something's going to happen to you eventually. All immortality means is that you have infinite lifetimes to slip and hit your head on the counter.

Also, I imagine at some point you'd have to replace degraded neurons, which leads to a Ship of Theseus situation.

I don't really fault you for the interest, but "forever" is a really long time...


Furrin_Gok said:
The Doctor is immortal, and he does perfectly fine.

no...he can be killed and has come very close to dying a lot of times. in fact, i think i remember a dalek shooting him at some point which killed him and resulted in his hand (the one he kept in that jar or whatever it was) regenerating into a sort of human/time lord hybrid.

and he doesn't actually have eternal life either as that one episode with him defending the town of Christmas showed him having aged into quite the elderly old man before those at galifrey granted him more regenerations.

so the doctor is definitely a mortal. just one with a potentially extremely long life span (assuming nothing kills him before old age triggers the next regeneration).


Fenrick said:
I mean, if you want to be really technical, living forever is not a goal you're going to attain unless you reach a life that is so far from where we are now that you would be unrecognizable as human, which is way beyond anti-aging things. But unless you get to that point, something's going to happen to you eventually.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longevity_escape_velocity

You seem to be implying that genetic alteration, mind uploading, or some other method that reduces the individual's resemblance to homo sapiens will be required. Maybe it will, maybe it won't. The point is that once your normal life or healthspan has been extended for 20 years, that's another 20 years of technological and medical development. There may be multiple achievable paths to the same goal.

Fenrick said:
All immortality means is that you have infinite lifetimes to slip and hit your head on the counter.

The chance of death can be lowered. Widespread adoption of driverless cars could cut a major source of accidental death down to a small fraction. I have seen an estimate around 15-20% but there is no way to be sure until it happens.

EMTs are beginning to trial on-scene cryotherapy to lower the body/brain temperature of patients. This could greatly improve the chances of surviving an accident, shooting, heart attack, stroke, etc.

Nerve stimulation has partially revived a man who suffered traumatic brain injury in a car accident and fell into a vegetative state. There is also the possibility of using stem cells to reverse clinical brain death.

So you can see that the boundaries of "death" are being pushed ever further. It could be that people we presume to be dead are just not being treated the right way. "Die" of a deadly poison? Put them on ice, remove the substance, and then restart their brain.

Even without all these fancy developments, there are people living to around 120 without dying of a car accident, mass shooting, meteor strike, or slipping and falling.

Fenrick said:
Also, I imagine at some point you'd have to replace degraded neurons, which leads to a Ship of Theseus situation.

Adult neurogenesis already happens to some extent even without talking about injecting stem cells into your brain. Your body's cells get replaced over time. You are already a living Ship of Theseus.

Human memory is generally fleeting and unreliable. You are at least a slightly different person than you were a few months ago. Your memories of events from years past are hazy and change each time you recall them. The Ship of Theseus has sailed. It doesn't matter now and it either won't matter later, or you won't have a choice but to sail even further.


Furrin_Gok said:
The Doctor is immortal, and he does perfectly fine.

In one of the episodes they visit The Doctor’s tomb. He might live for a long time, but he does die.